Leroy B. Scott, Esq., Ph.D.

 

 

PRACTICE

  • In my previous employment position, I handled litigation for a popular personal injury law firm in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. By starting my own firm, I will have greater control over providing excellent service to my clients. I will also be able to accept clients who have difficult cases and truly need someone to fight for them. 

 

BAR  ADMISSIONS

  • State of Texas (November 2012)

  • United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas

  • United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas

  • United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas

  • United States District Court for the Western District of Texas

 

EDUCATION

  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in psychology, 2016. When I am not practicing law, I study the effects of blame on legal decision-making. My dissertation research, which is being funded by the National Science Foundation, focuses on how "victim likeability" and "outcome severity" influence people's belief that company should be held legally liable for an employee's wrongdoing. 

  • University of Nebraska College of Law, Juris Doctor (law degree), 2012.

I graduated with honors from the University of Nebraska College of Law. About a week after graduation, I ran a marathon (26.2 miles) in Fargo, North Dakota, then drove to Dallas, Texas a few weeks later to start a new life.​

 

  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Master's degree in psychology, 2010.

After college, I enrolled at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln to pursue a Ph.D. in psychology. I completed my Master's degree along the way and I am still working on finishing the Ph.D. While enrolled at the University of Nebraska, I applied for and was accepted into the College of Law. The Law/Psychology Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has been recognized since its inception in 1974 as a leading program.

 

  • Livingstone College, Bachelor's degree in psychology, 2006

I moved to the United States in 2002 to attend Livingstone College, Salisbury, North Carolina. A few years later, I graduated summa cum laude and moved to Nebraska for graduate school. 

 

 

MANUSCRIPTS IN PROGRESS OR REVISION

  • Scott, L., Wylie, L., & Brank, E. (in progress). Praise, blame, and legal responsibility: Asymmetries of elder versus child care and abuse.

  • Brank, E., Hoetger, L., Wylie, L., & Scott, L. (in progress). Law enforcement officers’ and prosecuting attorneys’ perceptions of juvenile delinquency. Book chapter proposal accepted for inclusion in Children, Psychology and the Law.  

 

PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

  • Brank, E., & Scott, L. (2012). The historical, jurisprudential, and empirical wisdom of parental responsibility laws.  Social Issues and Policy Review.  

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS AND ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES

  • Brank, E., & Scott, L. (2012). Parental Responsibility for Delinquent Acts of Children. Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

 

MEDIA

  • Brank, E., & Scott, L. (2010). Violent video games: Are kids playing their hearts out? Monitor on Psychology, 41(10), 24.

  • Brank, E., & Scott, L. (2012). Let’s make a deal: The psychology of plea agreements. Monitor on Psychology, 43(4), 31.

 

PRESENTATIONS 

  • Scott, L., & Brank, E. (2014). The Role of Blame in a Blameless Legal Doctrine. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, Texas.

 

  • Scott, L., & Brank, E. (2012). “Get a hold of your kids before we have to!” Using parental responsibility laws to curb juvenile crimes. Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

 

  • Scott, L., Wylie, L., & Brank, E. (2011). Praise, blame, and legal responsibility: Asymmetries of elder versus child care and abuse. Paper presented at the Annual meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society, Miami, Florida.

 

  • Brank, E., & Scott, L. (2010, June). Unanticipated legal consequences: Caring for children and older adults. Interactive discussion presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

  • Scott, L. (2008). The relationship of self-compassion to symbolic racism. American Psychological Science, Chicago, Illinois.

 

  • Scott, L. (2007). Concerns about smoking consequences on relationships: The roles of smoking behavior, concern for others, and opinions of others. Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, Illinois.